Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860
Macul, Chile

©2017 by hector madrid. Proudly created with Wix.com

 

ABOUT ME…

Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Business and Management School, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

Doctor in Work and Organizational Psychology from The University of Sheffield, Institute of Work Psychology, United Kingdom and Bachelor in Psychology from Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

My subject of interest is about affect, creativity, and innovation at work in organizations. Emotions and moods are essential parts of our subjective daily life, which exert profound influences in the way we think and behave. So, I wonder whether, how, and when affect influences creative thinking and the proposition and implementation of novel ideas in the workplace.


Today, my questions are on from where affect emerges in organizations. I focus my attention on job complexity, such that my studies are about whether greater psychological cognitive demands would lead to greater positive and negative feelings and thereby, creativity. 

Furthermore, I am studying the role of interpersonal affective processes in promoting and implementing novel ideas at work. Specifically, I do research on the phenomenon described as affective presence together with interpersonal emotion regulation.

My research is about understanding basic psychological processes, rather than practical solutions to deal with problems in organizations. Thus, my interest is more about questions than answers. Nevertheless, knowledge derived from this research should be valuable to management in organizations, through its use and adoption by practitioners in HR management and organizational behavior. 

I hope you enjoy my work…

 
Stack of Notebooks

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

LEADER AFFECTIVE PRESENCE AND INNOVATION IN TEAMS

Affective presence is a novel personality construct that describes the tendency of individuals to make their interaction partners feel similarly positive or negative. We adopt this construct, together with the Input-Process-Output model of teamwork, to understand how team leaders influence team interaction and innovation performance. In two multisource studies, based on 350 individuals working in 87 teams of two public organizations and 734 individuals working in 69 teams of a private organization, we tested and supported hypotheses that team leader positive affective presence was positively related to team information-sharing, whereas team leader negative affective presence was negatively related to the same team process. In turn, team information-sharing was positively related to team innovation, mediating the effects of leader affective presence on this team output. The results indicate the value of adopting an interpersonal individual differences approach to understanding how affect-related characteristics of leaders influence interaction processes and complex performance in teams. [pdf]

Madrid, H. P., Totterdell, P., Niven, K., & Barros, E. (2016). Leader affective presence and innovation in teams. Journal of Applied Psychology, 101(5), 673-686.

DOES LEADER AFFECTIVE PRESENCE INFLUENCE COMMUNICATION OF CREATIVE IDEAS WITHIN WORK TEAMS?

Affective presence is a novel emotion-related personality trait, supported in experimental studies, concerning the extent to which a person makes his or her interaction partners feel the same way (Eisenkraft & Elfenbein, 2010). Applying this concept to an applied teamwork context, we proposed that team leader affective presence would influence team members’ communication of creative ideas. Multilevel modeling analysis of data from a survey study conducted with teams from a consultancy firm confirmed that team leader affective presence interacted with team member creative idea generation to predict inhibition of voicing their ideas. Specifically, withholding of ideas was less likely when team members generated creative ideas and their team leader had higher positive affective presence or lower negative affective presence. These findings contribute to emotion research by showing affective presence as a trait with interpersonal meaning, which can shape how cognition is translated into social behavior in applied performance contexts, such as teamwork in organizations. [pdf]

Madrid, H. P., Totterdell, P., & Niven, K. (2016). Does Leader-Affective Presence Influence Communication of Creative Ideas Within Work Teams? Emotion, 16(6), 798-802.

INVESTIGATING A PROCESS MODEL FOR LEADER AFFECTIVE PRESENCE, INTERPERSONAL EMOTION REGULATION, AND INTERPERSONAL BEHAVIOUR IN TEAMS

Leader affective presence is the tendency of leaders to elicit feelings that are consistent among other individuals, and has been supported as a relevant personality trait for understanding teamwork. Drawing on a model that integrates personality and emotion regulation, this study aimed to expand research on affective presence by proposing team members’ perceptions of leader interpersonal emotion regulation as a process that explains how leader affective presence is related to team member behaviour. In the model, teamness—the perception that interdependence and reflexivity are required in the team—is presented as a boundary condition to the effects of affective presence via emotion regulation. Results of a study conducted with 99 teams showed that team member ratings of leader positive affective presence were linked to their perceptions that leaders had used affect-improving emotion regulation which in turn was associated with greater team citizenship behaviour. Contrariwise, team member ratings of leader negative affective presence were associated with perceived use of affect-worsening emotion regulation by leaders which in turn was associated with lower levels of team citizenship, but only when teams were low in teamness. These findings contribute to understanding how leaders’ individual differences are related to teamwork through affective processes. [pdf]

Madrid, H., Totterdell, P., Niven, K., & Vasquez, C. (2018). Investigating a process model for leader affective presence, interpersonal emotion regulation, and interpersonal behaviour in teams. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology.

LEADER INTERPERSONAL EMOTION REGULATION AND INNOVATION IN TEAMS

Interpersonal emotion regulation is an important psychological function in social behaviour. However, this construct has still been scantly explored in work psychology and organizational settings, meaning that the effects of interpersonal emotion regulation on core aspects of work performance are as yet unknown. Thus, our article seeks to provide insight into how, in the context of teamwork in organizations, leaders can enhance team effectiveness by using interpersonal emotion regulation to capitalize on the important role that affects plays in team innovation. Using a multisource field study, we tested and supported a mediation model in which leaders’ attempts to improve their team members’ emotions were positively related to team innovation via team positive affective tone. Conversely, leader affect-worsening regulation was negatively related to team innovation via team negative affective tone. As such, we contribute to the work and organizational psychology literature by applying the notion of interpersonal emotion regulation in the teamwork setting, identifying specific behaviours of leaders that influence the development of novel ideas through shared affective experiences. [pdf]

Madrid, H. P., Niven, K. & Vasquez. C. A. (2019). Leader interpersonal emotion regulation and innovation in teams. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1111/joop.12292

 

COMPLETE LIST OF PUBLICATIONS

Doctoral Thesis y Book Chapters


  1. ​Madrid, H. P. & Patterson, M. G. (2019). Affect and Creativity. In R. Reiter-Palmon & J. C. Kaufmann (Eds.), Individual Creativity in the Workplace. Elsevier.

  2. Madrid, H. P. (2013). On innovation as an affect-driven work behaviour. PhD thesis, University of Sheffield. doi: 10.13140/RG.2.1.2762.3845. Advisors: Kamal Birdi, Malcolm Patterson, Examiners: Rob Briner and Carolyn Axtell


Journal Papers


  1. Madrid, H. P., Niven, K. & Vasquez. C. A. (2019). Leader interpersonal emotion regulation and innovation in teams. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1111/joop.12292

  2. Madrid, H., Totterdell, P., Niven, K., & Vasquez, C. (2018). Investigating a process model for leader affective presence, interpersonal emotion regulation, and interpersonal behaviour in teams. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology. doi: 10.1080/1359432X.2018.1505719

  3. Madrid, H. P., Diaz, M. T., Leka, S., Leiva, P. I., Barros, E. (2018). A finer grained approach to psychological capital and work performance. Journal of Business and Psychology. doi: 10.1007/s10869-017-9503-z

  4. Madrid, H. P., Totterdell, P., Niven, K., & Barros, E. (2016). Leader affective presence and innovation in teams. Journal of Applied Psychology, 101(5), 673-686. doi: 10.1037/apl0000078

  5. Madrid, H. P., Totterdell, P., & Niven, K. (2016). Does leader-affective presence influence communication of creative ideas within work teams? Emotion, 16(6), 798-802. doi: 10.1037/emo0000183

  6. Kausel, E., Culbertson S., S., Madrid, H. P. (2016) Overconfidence in personnel selection: When and why unstructured interview information can hurt hiring decisions. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 137, 27-44. doi: 10.1016/j.obhdp.2016.07.005

  7. Madrid, H. P. & Patterson, M. (2016). Creativity at work as a joint function between openness to experience, need for cognition and organizational fairness. Learning and Individual Differences. 51, 409-416. doi: 10.1016/j.lindif.2015.07.010

  8. Madrid, H. P., Patterson, M. G. & Leiva P. I. (2015). Negative core affect and employee silence: How differences in activation, rumination and job complexity matter. Journal of Applied Psychology, 100(6), 1887-1898. doi: 10.1037/a0039380

  9. Madrid, H. P., Birdi, K., Patterson, M., Leiva, P. & Kausel, E. (2014). The role of weekly high-activated positive mood, context and personality in innovative work behavior: A multilevel and interactional model. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 35, 234-256. doi: 10.1002/job.1867

  10. Madrid, H. P. & Patterson, M. (2014). Measuring affective states at work based on the valence and arousal circumplex model: Factorial cross-validation between English and Spanish of the Multi-Affect Indicator. Spanish Journal of Psychology, 17, e50, 1-12. doi: 10.1017/sjp.2014.54


Conference Papers


  1. Madrid, H (2019). Team member Interpersonal emotion regulation and innovation. 19th Congress of the European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology (EAWOP). May 29th–June 20th, Turin, Italy.

  2. Madrid, H. (2018). Leader interpersonal emotion regulation and voice in teams. Work presented in the 78th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management (AOM). August 10-14, Chicago, United States.

  3. Madrid, H., Niven, K. & Vasquez, C. (2018). Leader interpersonal emotion regulation in teams. Eleventh International Conference on Emotions and Organizational Life (‘Emonet XI’), Chicago, United States. Awarded as the best conference paper.

  4. Madrid, H. & Patterson, M. (2018). A valence and arousal examination of affect and creativity at work. Eleventh International Conference on Emotions and Organizational Life (‘Emonet XI’), Chicago, United States.

  5. Madrid, H., Niven, K. & Vasquez, C. (2018). Leader interpersonal emotion regulation in teams. 5th Biennial Institute of Work Psychology Conference on Work, Well-being & Performance. June 19th–21th, Sheffield, United Kingdom

  6. Madrid, H. & Patterson. (2017). Reciprocal influences between positive affect and innovative work behavior. 18th Congress of the European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology (EAWOP). May 17–20th, Dublin, Ireland.

  7. Madrid, H. P. (2016). Experiencia afectiva y creatividad en el trabajo: Más allá que la mera positividad. 3er Congreso Chileno de Psicología del Trabajo y las Organizaciones. 3 y 4 de Noviembre, La Serena, Chile.

  8. Madrid, H. P. (2016). Hacia una psicología laboral centrada-en-la-persona. 3er Congreso Chileno de Psicología del Trabajo y las Organizaciones. 3 y 4 de Noviembre, La Serena, Chile.

  9. Madrid, H. P. & Barros, E. (2016). A person-situation approach to self-efficacy, job demands and employee voice. 31th Annual Conference of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP). April 14-16, Anaheim, California, United States.

  10. Madrid, H., Totterdell, P., Niven, K. & Barros, E. (2015). Leader affective presence and innovation in teams. Work presented in the 75rd Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management (AOM). August 7-11, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

  11. Madrid, H., Totterdell, P. & Niven, K. (2015). Do leaders with negative affective presence silence novel ideas within work teams? Work presented in the 17th Congress of the European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology (EAWOP). May 20–23th, Oslo, Norway.

  12. Madrid, H., Patterson, M. & Leiva, P. (2014). Negative moods and silence: Rumination and complexity as boundary conditions. Work presented in the 29th Annual Conference of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP). May15-17, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States.

  13. Madrid, H., Totterdell, P., Niven, K. & Barros, E. (2013). How leader affective presence relates to proactive behavior in teams. Work presented in the 73rd annual meeting of the Academy of Management (AOM). August 9-13, Lake Buena Vista (Orlando), Florida, United States.

  14. Madrid, H. & Patterson, M. (2013). The dual-model of affect and innovative work behavior: How feelings interplay with job characteristics in generating, promoting and implementing novel ideas. Work presented in the 16th congress of the European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology (EAWOP). May 22–25th Münster, Germany.

  15. Madrid, H., Birdi, K., Patterson, M., Leiva, P., Kausel, E. (2012). The power of momentary feelings and their dispositional correlates over innovative work behaviour. Work presented in the 3th Biennial Institute of Work Psychology Conference on Work, Well-being & Performance. June 26th–28th, Sheffield, United Kingdom. Trabajo premiado como el mejor artículo de la conferencia.

  16. Madrid, H., Birdi, K., Patterson, M., Leiva, P., Kausel, E. (2012). Innovative work behavior engagement: Testing a multilevel and interactional model. Work presented in the 8th International Conference on Emotions and Worklife (EMONET) Hanken School of Economics. July 2nd-3th, Helsinki, Finland.

  17. Madrid, H. (2012). Engaging innovative work behavior: The role of job-related moods. Work presented in the Combined Sheffield Universities Doctoral Conference. May 22th–23th, Sheffield Management School, United Kingdom.

  18. Madrid, H., Birdi, K. (2011). Job satisfaction as a joint function of support for innovation and organizational identification. Work presented in the 15th Conference of the European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology (EAWOP). May 25–28th Maastricht, The Netherlands.

  19. Madrid, H. (2011). Individual innovation and job-related psychological well-being in teams. Work presented in the Combined Sheffield Universities Doctoral Conference. April 19th–20th, Sheffield Management School, United Kingdom.

  20. Madrid H. (2010). Team climate for innovation: a psychometric approach. Work presented in the Second EAWOP Early Career Conference for Advance Work and Organizational Psychology. September 11th–17th. Valencia, Spain.